Create Media-Rich Lessons


The traditional center rotation involves students moving from one area to another, and at each stop they learn something new. Using multimedia in your lessons can guide students towards accessing information they can research on their own. In this article, we will look at 3 easy ways to create media-rich lessons.

QR Codes

When I used centers in elementary school, I needed students to be able to pronounce words properly, but I couldn’t always be right there to correct or help them. I started using QR Codes to give students access to an audio recording of words they were to pronounce. Another one was when reading in groups, point a QR Code to a URL of a recording of the book they were reading so they could listen before starting to read.

Use QR Codes in Media-Rich Lessons

Use QR Codes in Media-Rich Lessons

Google Drawings

Another way is to create a Google Drawing (or Slide you can embed in a blog) that has icons of the media type you are linking to (via Eric Curts). Have text you want students to read? Put an icon of a Document in your Drawing and add a link to the icon that leads to the Doc. Have a movie you want students to watch? Put an icon of YouTube and link to it. (Think of the DragonGate graphic.)

HyperDocs

Another way to do this is by using a HyperDoc. In this example, the teacher has put the information students will need to know, along with a place for them to write notes on their learning.

Media-Rich: Consumption vs Creation

It is great to have students use technology, but how can you use technology to have students create? We would like to hear your efforts directing students towards the ultimate goal at the top of the Bloom’s taxonomy pyramid: creation! Leave us a comment below.

Leave a Reply